National Poetry Day in Whangarei Friday August 25 – ‘Lingo’ youth poetry slam

Lingo poetry slam

10am – 2pm
Lingo+Learn: An open writing and poetry workshop designed for anyone wanting to learn and engage in Poetry and writing, Hosted by Whangarei collective Poetry Posse at NYT (86 Bank Street – upstairs). Bring lead or ink, paper or pad, water and snacks and an open mind.

From 6.30pm
Lingo+Love: The Old Stone Butter Factory will be an epicentre of eccentric eclecticism as the open mic explodes with Lingo from all corners of the universe. We then succumb to the voice of youth in a final Youth Poetry Slam. Hosted by Poetry Posse member Vincent Nathan. Be prepared for an linguistc feast of words.

!!!REGISTER FOR THE EVENT SO THEY KNOW YOU’RE COMING!!!

http://bit.ly/2u9vgVm

 

OTHER EVENTS:

Kawakawa

Kings Theatre Creative Poetry Open Mic – Warm-down event
Get together with your family and friends at Kings Theatre Creative in Kawakawa to be moved by an afternoon of diverse, compelling, engaging and outrageous poetry. Feature poets include Olivia Macassey, Martin Porter, Piet Nieuwland and many others who are in the freshly launched Fast Fibres Poetry 4. Unleash your creativity and perform your poetry live at the open mic session.
Entry Details: $5 koha, all ages welcome
Date /Time: Sunday 27 August 1.30pm to 4pm
Location: Kings Theatre Creative 80 Gillies Street Kawakawa
Contact: Piet Nieuwland fastfibres@live.com 0274805548
Further Information: https://www.facebook.com/KingsTheatreCreative/ | https://fastfibres.wordpress.com/


Whangarei

Lingo+Learn
An open writing and poetry workshop designed for anyone wanting to learn and engage in Poetry and writing, Hosted by Whangarei collective Poetry Posse at NYT (86 Bank Street – upstairs). Bring lead or ink, paper or pad, water and snacks and an open mind.
Entry Details: Free, open to all. Register by 24th August at The Old Stone Butter Factory or by email to vincenttnathan@gmail.com
Date/Times: Friday 25th August – workshop 10am – 2pm.
Location: Northland Youth Theatre
Contact: Vincent Nathan email: vincenttnathan@gmail.com Txt: 0212147714
Further Infohttps://www.facebook.com/events/317914338635589/?ti=icl


Lingo+Love – Open Mic & Slam
The Old Stone Butter Factory will be an epicentre of eccentric eclecticism as the open mic explodes with Lingo from all corners of the universe. We then succumb to the voice of youth in a final Youth Poetry Slam. Hosted by Poetry Posse member Vincent Nathan. Be prepared for a linguistic feast of words!
Entry Details: Free, open to all. Sign up to read on the open mic on the night. To register for the slam competition, please email your details to vincenttnathan@gmail.com
Date/Times: Friday 25th August. Slam starts at 6.30pm.
Location: The Old Stone Butter Factory
Contact: Vincent Nathan email: vincenttnathan@gmail.com | Txt:0212147714
Further Infohttps://www.facebook.com/events/317914338635589/?ti=icl

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‘Dirty Chick’ by Antonia Murphy of Purua, Northland

(words courtesy of AntoniaMurphy.com)

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An uproarious memoir chronicling the misadventures of a born-and-bred San Franciscan who leaves city life to become an artisanal farmer in New Zealand

After a traumatic experience caring for her father’s chicken, Antonia Murphy vowed to never again take responsibility for a living creature besides her children. That all changed when Antonia uprooted her urban family and moved to Purua, New Zealand, a small rural community where many of the residents lived as their forebears had done for centuries, raising livestock, growing their own food, and making cheese.

It was an odd place for American yuppies to settle, but after Antonia’s five-year-old son was diagnosed with a developmental delay, she feared that he would struggle at a fast-paced city school. She and her husband wanted him to grow up in a place where he could thrive and be part of a community. How great it would be to get back to the land! How responsible and progressive and eco-friendly, she thought. So what if she had zero farming experience? How hard could it be?

As Antonia later noted, “You don’t see dairy farmers moving to the city with big ideas about being cardiologists for fun.” Soon, she found herself carrying poop in her purse, trying to wrangle a rogue dairy cow, and impregnating a goat. But Antonia soldiered on, slowly becoming addicted to farm life—even if she’ll never be a natural.

Part touching story of a family starting over and part raunchy send-up of the burgeoning artisan farming movement, Dirty Chick will make readers laugh, cringe, and root for its incredible, unlikely heroine.

Visit one of these online retailers to order now:

Review it here:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22323933-dirty-chick

 

NZ Secondary School Writing Competition – let’s get Northlanders represented

Sunday Spoken Word – ‘Just One Thing’ poetry event in Whangarei

A spoken word event Sunday July 2 in Whangarei was a chance for fresh poets to perform alongside experienced poets.

CCS Disability Action Northland had been running a series of creative arts workshops in which young people have had an opportunity to create and tell their own stories as spoken word monologues.

Those powerful poems, giving insight into the lives of disabled members of the community, were performed to the public at the event. Performances also came from the Poetry Posse (Vincent Nathan, Vivian Thonger, Brett Ruys, Michael Botur, Nga-Atawhainga Manukau), the Whangarei Girls High poetry crew (Jorja Heta, Shian Cottam, Emma Hutchinson) and singer/guitarist Koea Kaka.

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NorthWrite 2017 at Kawakawa: Flash Fiction Fiesta

NorthWrite 2017 was held Sunday June 25 at Kings Theatre Creative, Kawakawa, in conjunction with National Flash Fiction Day. Vivian Thonger and band put on a flash fiction workshop with live music to provide inspiration.

Later in the afternoon, Northland flash fiction writers – including many published on Flash Frontier or longlisted for National Flash Fiction Day – had their work read in person or by guests.

Vivian Thonger was recipient of this year’s Northwrite award.  Shot, Viv!

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Flash was read by Northlanders in person or by a representative, including writers:

  • Piet Nieuwland
  • Jody Reynolds
  • Jac Jenkins
  • Kathy Derrick
  • Vivian Thonger
  • Sian Williams
  • Michael Botur
  • Martin Porter
  • Kelly Stratford
  • Shani Naylor
  • Rachel Smith
  • Kamala Jackson
  • Jacinta van der Linden
  • Patrick Pink
  • Rita Shelley

 

 

 

Northland Experience Inspires Short Stories

A Whangarei writer says ‘working class’ experiences he has had since moving to Northland inspired his latest short story collection. Michael Botur profile pic for Property Plus.JPG

Michael Botur released Lowlife: short stories on June 16. The book is Botur’s fourth short story collection, with the previous collections garnering strong reviews.

Lowlife has a thoroughly Northland flavour to it, featuring a unique “gang patch” cover stitched by Whangarei’s Headrush Custom Caps and photographed at The Old Butter Factory.

Lowlife is literary fiction; the style is often described as ‘dirty realism.’

“I’ve had lots of hairy experiences in my life; some of those have been in Northland, like getting stuck in a Kaitaia flophouse, almost crashing a ride-on lawnmower gardening at a mansion on Kamo, or doing drug surveys with armed robbers in the Whangarei police cells,” the 33 year old says. “So the Lowlife stories aren’t only about Northland milieu – they’re about people stuck in conflict trying to work their way out of it, trying to make their lives better.”

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“My characters often share frustrations with me as we both try to make our lives better in a part of the country where there’s not much money circulating. Buying a cheap house in Tikipunga and trying to escape Generation Rent has been a particularly big influence on me. That’s a class conflict thing, and class conflict is a big theme in the stories.”

“Northland has the lowest median income in NZ, so it’s no surprise a lack of money motivates plenty of characters in my stories. Throughout my twenties it was always hand-to-mouth for me and my wife – that’s a struggle most young people share whether you have the privilege of tertiary education or not.”

Botur says all stories come from a kernel, which may be a quote, a character or an event.

“One Friday afternoon in Cameron Street Mall in Whangarei I watched two CitySafe security guards chasing a young man, a shoplifter. I followed beside him in my car as he sprinted through a carpark. I didn’t have the heart – or the balls – to catch the guy, even though I could have blocked his escape. Later that night I went to my data collection job at the Whangarei Police Station (interviewing arrestees about their drug use). I made small talk with the cops on duty about tailing the shoplifter. They asked me if I tackled the shoplifter to stop him and I struggled to explain that I didn’t have the heart to make life worse for a young person who was probably down on his luck and desperate. The cops seemed unimpressed about that. All the politics that came into play there inspired a story, Wonder Woman, which is in the collection.”

Another story, Survive September, is about the difficulty parents get into when they need to work low-paying, low-skilled jobs, and then get hit with a big daycare bill every week, Botur explains. “When I first moved to Northland in April 2015, I couldn’t afford to put my one year old daughter in daycare, because daycare isn’t subsidised until kids turn 3. I was stuck at home with her, feeling useless. There are virtually no work-from-home jobs in Northland. So that story is in honour of all the stay-at-home dads out there who are desperate to earn more income but have to be there for their babies.”

“I have done innumerable days of $15-an-hour labouring work over the past few years while building up a good portfolio/CV so I feel deep empathy with people who struggle to earn the ‘living wage’ of $20 per hour – a struggle which, unfortunately, is more acute in Northland.”

“When I had little paid writing work in Northland, I even had to work a few shifts at The Warehouse in Whangarei, including stocktaking for ten hours some nights, and that unreal experience inspired another story in this collection.”

Michael Botur works as a freelance writer and volunteers promoting Northland creative writing at www.WriteUpNorth.co.nz . Submissions and new members are warmly welcomed.

Lowlife is available from Amazon.com and www.NZShortStories.com

250pp ISBN-13: 978-1547018598 RRP $24.99